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The core text of the naturan way of life, the book

"Living - without harming or killing Animals or Plants" by A. Wang
is available from Dragon Publishers.
Phone + 49 (0)177-818 91 63 • Schulstr. 33, 25774 Lehe, Germany • Dragon-Verlag
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At present the book is only available in German. Parts of the book are already translated.
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"Living - without harming or killing Animals or Plants" by A. Wang  ISBN 3-9803064-0-2
540 pages, Paperback, environmentally friendly paper, 4th edition 1998, 19,40 Euro

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Book review 1

This is the core text for peaceful ways of life.  It describes a means to provide people with high quality, healthy products, which simultaneously respects the existence of animals and plants.  It demonstrates how a desire to live in peace with all life forms can be put into practice.  The person who would like to develop –  to everyone’s advantage - to live in harmony with nature and in friendship and solidarity with animals and plants is of central importance. 

In terms of personal development there is a commentated questionnaire for the analysis and improvement of ones own way of life and the achievement of personal goals.  The discussion of scientific information in ethical and philosophical terms is unique.  The amazing manifestations of life and the abilities of plants and animals are introduced and the scientific theories are combined with a philosophy of respect for the individual.  The result is an abundance of suggestions for the practical realisation of respect for the existential needs of living beings.  Hundreds of ideas for delicious meals (5-minute meals, bargain meals, complete menus, a section for children and teenagers) as well as many suggestions for environmentally friendly products and services will enrich readers.  The diversity of subjects makes this an extensive reference book.  It is also a helpful guide for many situations in life. There are chapters on

-healthy nutrition

-on the processing and preservation of foodstuffs

-on the production of cosmetics, cleaning products and healing remedies

-possible interventions in the treatment of psychosomatic illnesses and eating disorders are explained

-many easily obtainable household products as well as ethical healing methods are introduced.

-Even specialist themes such as diet whilst travelling, trekking and environmentally friendly survival training are discussed in detail.

-healthy pet foods and useful additions to the diet are presented.

-there are tips to secure the existence of plant and animal friendly farming or an alternative animal shelter.

-In the representation of naturan agriculture and livestock farming, the welfare of animal and plant is central.

-in the sections on industry and environmental protection the influence of economics on politics is described.  The profit orientated exploitation is not necessary and leads to a ruthless treatment of living beings, which in turn has a damaging effect on human beings. The answer lies in a peaceful way of life.

 

This book is life affirming and a mine of deep insights and good arguments for a lifestyle which respects all creatures.  Special attention is paid to the numerous possibilities within the area of personal responsibility.  The author conveys the beauty of nature and an admiration, respect and esteem for its creatures. Those who injure or kill animals or plants are advised to resort to benign ways of expressing destructive energies.  The conscious protection of nature and living beings through the use of those products whose production does not cause injury or death to plants or animals, is a way of life which brings deep and lasting happiness.  There are many ways to protect the lives of animals and plants and to be of use to nature.  Joy of life, fulfilment and enlightenment are the result.

 


Book Review 2


L i v i n g  - without harming or killing Animals or Plants by A.Wang

 

In the future, will people be life affirming and well meaning and will they act responsibly in terms of  health and the health of their fellow men and fellow creatures?  Will they love nature and want to understand the existential needs and different expressions of animals and plants?  Or will the gloomy visions of the future of an ignorant, violent humanity come true, that will go to ruin in a contaminated environment with only their own egotism to blame?  How can the transformation to a life begin, that is thankfully understood as a chance to develop a vital life force and do good?  The transformation, as this book shows, starts with the individual, at first with a friendly attitude towards all life forms, which then becomes a benevolent way of life which benefits all of life and nature.

The experience of using the means at ones disposal for the well being of all living beings and nature improves ones outlook on life and produces an intense experience of joy and harmony.

 

It has long been proven that not only animals but plants are sensitive living beings.  But how do humans use this knowledge?  This book shows that it is not difficult to respect the needs of plants and animals.  The reader will notice that this respect need not mean a life in the stone age.  Modern technologies also have their place as long as they do no harm.  But, the reader may ask, are there not natural boundaries which we have no choice but to accept?  Yes there are.  In this book the possible scope of human activity is discussed in detail.  Nevertheless humans do not have to kill or harm, but can enjoy a positive and constructive attitude.  Further, the attentive reader may ask, what about destructive impulses, what about rage, hate, fear and aggression?  The suggestions for action introduced in this book make it clear that it is important to handle these tendencies in an undamaging way, instead of expressing this inner conflict subconsciously, to the detriment of others.  The book  ‘L i v i n g  - without harming or killing Animals or Plants’ convinces through its factual scientific presentation.  The logical treatment of knowledge proves that a peaceful way of life must be neither a boring nor an unrealistic vision for the future.  The argument of the book is that the history of man has proven that individual people as well as societies have the potential to develop.  In fact, people have been known to muster a lot of strength when the goal is worth it.  Perhaps a transformation to a compassionate, responsible culture of respect for all living beings and for peace with nature is possible.

Book Review 3

This extensive book makes it clear to the reader the extent to which we humans influence, disturb or even destroy the diverse phenomena of life through habit, carelessness or profiteering. In a subtle and detailed form the author suggests possible alternatives and points out ways we can change our traditional behavioural patterns with respect to nutrition, animal, plant and environmental protection which we have formed over generations.

In the new edition current scientific learning about animals and plants is addressed. Quotes from different cultures prove that a vegetarianism which considers the needs of animals and plants was thought about a long time ago.

The section 'Healthy Nutrition' covers about 400 meals as well as suggestions about 'Preservation and Storage of Foodstuffs'. The chapters 'Nutrition in Cases of Emergency and in Survival Training' 'Pet foods, Remedies and Cosmetics' as well as 'The Work of Animal and Environmental Protection Agencies' and the 'Catalogue of Questions for the Improvement of Ones Own Lifestyle' were enriched through supplementary information.

The themes ‘Agriculture’ and ‘Economic Changes on Personal and Societal Level‘ and ‘Models for the Future’ show that the provision with products and services of a high quality is attainable through a peaceful way of life.

In the epilogue is written 'ones own world view is in constant flux through new information ... it is an individual achievement to realise that plants too are living beings. It is an achievement not just to realise this as a scientific fact, but to integrate it into ones view and way of life and reflect it practically.
Common to all living beings - independent of form and physiology - is the endeavour to exist without pain or injury.

Compassion and inner strength cannot be forced, but can only be developed through an open mind. This also means having consideration for ones own abilities.

The core text of the naturan way of life describes peaceful ways of life. These are founded on a willingness to be peaceful towards everything which lives, which reacts to its environment and is thus sensitive. The central theme is to show how man can live in harmony with animals and plants to everyone’s advantage. The focus here, is the well-being of animals and plants.

Singular is the discussion of scientific information from an ethical and philosophical point of view. The result is a wealth of suggestions to put into practice.
Hundreds of ideas for delicious meals (five minute meals, a special section for children and teenagers) as well as many suggestions for environmentally friendly products and services are enriching for the reader.

The diversity of subjects makes this book an extensive reference book. It is also a helpful guide for difficult situations in life.

There is a chapter on healthy nutrition, on the processing and preservation of foodstuffs, on the production of cosmetics, cleaning products and healing remedies. Possible interventions in the case of psychosomatic illnesses, eating disorders as well as undamaging healing methods are explained.
Scientific subjects such as ones diet whilst travelling, whilst trekking and even for environmentally friendly survival training as well as healthy pet food are discussed. There are tips to help secure the existence of naturan farming or an alternative animal shelter or retirement home.

I particularly enjoyed the catalogue of questions for the analysis and improvement of ones own way of life and for the achievement of ones desired goals. In the sections on industry an environmental protection, the economic influence of politics is described. The ruthless, profitorientated exploitation of the environment leads to the disregard of living beings. The naturan way of life offers individual chances and ways out and also refers to ones own sense of responsibility.

Even chapters which I read for enjoyment and for the sake of completeness revealed themselves as a mine of deep insights and good arguments for a lifestyle of respect for all creatures.
I recommend this book to an open-minded readership - because the central theme is the person who wants to develop, so they can live in friendship and solidarity with plants and animals. This book is life affirming and undogmatic. To those who injure or kill animals and plants, the author suggests benign forms of expressing destructive energies.

The possibilities to protect the lives of animals and plants are manifold. Happiness, joy of life and deep insights are the results of this kind of respect.

 

Article about the Book

"Living - without harming or killing Animals and Plants" by A. Wang

Vegetarian nutrition - without harming or killing animals and plants.
For people who live as vegetarians and also want to regard the lives of plants the naturan way of life is of interest. The naturan way of life consists in the consideration of the existential needs of man, animal and plant as individual beings.
A living being is characterised by its ability to perceive environmental influences and react to them. A plant answers to stimuli by adjusting to sunlight and sending its roots through the earth in search of water and nutrients. In order to be able to react to stimuli, they must be perceived as helpful or damaging. Plants are life forms which in life endeavour to avoid damage to their organism and achieve well-being.
The botanist Raoul Francé describes it thus: 'Where there are activities of life and stimuli there must also be instruments to receive and transmit them ...what is the point of such efforts if there is nothing which receives the experience and utilised what is won? This reception is called perception, the utilisation of perception provides something which one otherwise describes with the awkward term s o u l' (translation of the German edition, 1905, Pg. 69). Charles Darwin compared root tips to the brain of a lowly animal ('The Scope of Movement in Plants', translation of the German edition, original Title: Das Bewegungsvermögen der Pflanzen, Stuttgart, 1919, Pg. 492).

The followers of the indian Jainist religion, which looks back upon an at least 2500 year old tradition are active for vegetarianism and recognise plants as living beings worth protecting.
A statement by Mahavira, the historic founder of Jainism reads: “No lowly animal, no plant, no higher creature, no other living thing may be beaten or destroyed”.

There are countless foodstuffs whose use does not lead to the damage of animals and plants, e.g. fruits, grains, seeds, nuts, legumes, and fruit vegetables.
Plants separate themselves from fruit and seed so their organism need not be damaged. Only when seeds germinate do they become sensitive life forms. Most annual plants have already died when they are harvested and have completed their natural lifecycle. This food group includes farinaceous products (bread, pastry, pasta, dumplings, pizza, etc.), pulses such as peas, lentils, and soya products, rice, semolina, fruit vegetables (tomatoes, zucchinis, aubergines, avocados, cucumbers, pumpkins) as well as herbs and spices and teas from seeds and fruits.

Some meal suggestions: pasta with tomato sauce, soya burgers with rice and zucchini in a light sauce, pea or lentil soup, cereal patties, steamed avocado, pizza with grilled aubergine, lentil soup with tofu and beans, smoked tofu, soya sausages with pasta salad, semolina with raspberry sauce, cream of tomato soup.

In the naturan care of plants and animals the well-being of the living beings is central. Some animal products (free-range eggs, milk and milk products, honey and pollen) can be collected without damage under certain conditions. Such conditions are currently still rare. The vegan diet points out the problematic nature of the animal industries which needs to be taken seriously.

Vegan-naturan means: the replacement of animal products through plant alternatives, which do not lead to the injury or death of plants.
In the naturan way of life, healthy high quality products are gained and comforts achieved without being at the expense of other living beings and of the environment.
The realisation of respect for the existential needs of living beings through consideration and care is a value which is experienced as happiness, increasing inner strength and joy.


Excerpts from the Book

Beyond the Table of Contents there are some excerpts from the text.


Contents

Preface

Introducion

I. Foodstuffs

1. Philosophical and Ethical Foundations
Living without harming and killing Animals and Plants
1.1. The Foundations of an Intellectual and Psychological Development
1.2. A Peaceful Way of Life
1.3. The Anthropocentric View of Nature
1.4. The Natural Human Scope of Activity
1.5. A Plants Expression of Life
1.5.1 Metabolism
1.5.2 Reproductive Technologies and Methods of Dissemination
1.5.3 Growth
1.5.4 Sensitivity
1.5.4.1 Perception
1.5.4.2 The Work of Cleve Baxter
1.5.4.3 Movement
1.5.4.4 The Roots
1.5.4.5 Meat-Eating Plants
1.5.4.6 Protective Measures
1.6 Communication
1.7 Energy Fields produced by Living Beings
1.8 A Peaceful Way of Life as Guarantor for an Optimum Quality of Life
1.9 Thought Patterns and their Consequences
1.10 Interaction with People who Injure and Kill Others
1.11 The Misuse of the Expression „Harmony with Nature“
1.12 The Development of Living Beings
1.13 The Equality of all Living Beings

2. Foods which can be produced without harming, injuring or killing Animals and Plants
2.1 Food groups which can be consumed without harming Animals and Plants.
2.2 Milk and Milk Products
2.2.1 Processing of Milk
2.3 Honey and Bee Pollen
2.4 Eggs from Free Range Chickens
2.5 Grain, Corn, Kernels, Seeds, Fruits, Vegetables, Pulses Legumes
2.5.1 Possibilities of Utilisation and Processing Methods
2.6 Salt
2.7 (Mineral) Water

3. Meals
3.1 Meal Suggestions
3.2 Drinks
3.3 Cold Dishes
3.4 Popular Dishes for Children and Teenagers
3.4.1 Snacks for Children and Teenagers
3.5 5-Minute Meals
3.6 Bargain Meals
3.7 Sweets and Desserts
3.8 Party Dishes
3.9 Menu Suggestions
3.10 Casseroles
3.11 Baking

II. Healthy Nutrition and the Careful Processing of Foods

4. A Healthy Diet
4.1 Healthy Eating Patterns
4.2 The Change Over/Conversion

5. Processing of Foodstuffs
5.1 Hygiene
5.2 Conservation and Preservation
5.2.1 Storage
5.2.2 Practical Housekeeping
5.2.3 The Workplace for Food Preparation and the Cooking Area
5.3 Food stock

6. The Diet in Cases of Emergency and in Survival Training
6.0.1. Air
6.0.2. Warmth
6.0.3. Water
6.0.4. Food
6.1 Gathering of Food in Natural Landscapes
6.1.1 Preparation and Further Processing of Foodstuffs
6.2 Provisions for Outings: Hikes, Trekking etc.

7. Petfoods

III. Remedies and Cosmetics

8. Remedies
8.1 Dealing with Emotions
8.2 Conscious and Subconscious
8.3 The Treatment of Psychosomatic Illness
8.4 Environmental Illnesses
8.5 Medications
8.6 Recommended Healing Methods
8.7 Particularities of the Aging Process
8.8 Addiction and Weight Control
8.9 Meditation
8.10 Household Remedies

9. Cosmetics
9.1 Cosmetics and Production of Cosmetics
9.1.1 Skin Cleansers
9.1.2 Bath Salts and Essences
9.1.3 Healing Oils and Massage Oils
9.1.4 Creams and Ointments
9.1.5 Face Packs and Masques
9.1.6 Various Applications

IV. Environmentalism and Industry

10. Environmentalism and Industry

10.2 Agriculture and the Livestock Industry
10.2.1 Distribution of Land
10.2.2 Setting up Plant and Animal Farming
10.2.3 Installation of Plantations and Open Air Enclosures
10.2.4 Correct Plant and Animal Care
10.2.5 Material Security
10.2.6 Agriculture in Harmony with Nature
10.2.6.1 Improving Soil Quality
10.2.6.2 Plantations and Livestock Care
10.2.6.3 Gentle Harvesting Methods
10.2.6.4 Distribution
10.3 Global Food Supplies
10.2.1 Overpopulation
10.4 Production and Manufacture of Products
10.4.1 Retail
10.4.2 Large-Scale Industries and their Influence on Politics and Society
10.4.3 The Web of Dependency
10.4.4 Economic Changes on Personal and Societal Level

11. Models for the Future
11.1 The Gain of Plant and Animal Products
11.2 The Conservation of Nature
11.3 Improving Plant and Animal Rights
11.4 Information
11.5 The Conversion of Industry to Environmentally Friendly Technologies
11.6 Society, State and Taxes
11.7 Environmental Organisations and Initiatives which Protect Plants, Animals and Humans
11.7.1 The Desire for Recognition
11.7.2 Competition between Organisations
11.7.3 Rival Diversion Strategies
11.7.4 The Workings of Nature

Summary
Epilogue

Excerpts from the Book


Preface

The book presented here describes „naturanism“ as a way of life based on the renunciation of all intentional harming or killing of sensitive forms of life.
Two approaches complement one another
- the theoretical presentation of man`s possibilities to consider the interests of all creatures in his actions and
- the realistic assessment of human behaviour which - as historical and present–day examples prove – tend to kill and maim unnecessarily.
In the production of milk, eggs, honey, wool, fruits and seeds for example this could be easily avoided.
Animals which are kept for the production of milk or eggs are selected and only the most productive ones are allowed to live. Male animals are often killed immediately or raised only to be as soon as their level of efficiency drops. Today the overwhelming majority of goods coming from animals or plants are produced under painful and cruel circumstances.
The vegan way of life renunciates products coming from animals.Veganism proves that the use of animals is not necessary for human subsistence. The well-being of plants is not considered by vegans.
Futher on there is the fructarian way of life where only fruits, fruity vegetables, seeds (mostly cereals and rice) and nuts are consumed, thing which are produced in great numbers by the plants. They would shed them anyway if the harvest techniques would allow it.
The difference between the vegan and the naturan way of life presented here is that the latter does not tolerate the harming or killing of animals and plants for human needs.
Naturanisms asumes that it is not possible to keep animals and plants - especially the bred races – in a way that allows man to use their products without making them suffer.
The intention to provide security and well-being for every individual creature takes priority over any other interest.
Advantages must be offered to creatures which produce things for human consumption. For example living conditions adapted to the species, enough possibilities to move, good health care and a general care for their individual needs. In the manifold forms of life the individual right to exist is respected as being equal. The more a creature resembles man the easier it seem to recognise itistbility to suffer. This seems to be a reason why people are more eager to protect animals than plants. The latter are mostly excluded from our sympathetic respect.
The exclusion of certain categories of creatures from the right to exist – for example the plants – comes out of an unsatisfactory mental attitude. The discriminatory idea remains there although it is not necessary for man to discriminate between creatures.
The willingness to consider all creatures`need s grows when people learn more about the possibilities to get products of satisfactory qualitiy without damaging others.
The book shows that a way of life based on the respect for the individual will eventually raise the quality of life because the agreeable nature of the chosen products leads to better health and therefore to a higher pleasure. Moreover our vitality can be intensified because our mind becomes clearer and more receptive if we try to consider the interests of other creatures and avoid the damage of nature.


1.2.    A Peaceful Way of Life and the Naturan Lifestyle (short version)

A peaceful way of life and the naturan lifestyle consist in the attempt to save plants, animals and humans from pain and suffering. Feelings like pain/suffering and well-being/wellness provide a primary means of orientation and act as pointers, which are necessary for the survival of all living beings. It is of vital importance for every living being, be it plant, animal or human, to be able to react to stimuli in such a way that prevents damage to the organism. An individual receives information through the experience of sensations, independently of the intellectual understanding of a situation. This latter form of understanding requires too much time when an instantaneous and essential reaction is involved to protect the organism. When a living being approaches fire for the first time, whilst within a particular distance it feels a pleasant, comforting warmth. As soon as the organism goes beyond a healthy distance, however, a sensation of pain provides a warning. All life forms - plants animals and humans - possess an ability to feel, through which they gain information which allows for immediate reaction, and which enables them to conserve life within their behavioural repertoire.

Part of a peaceful, naturan way of life is respect for individuals, as well as consideration for their existential needs, within the scope of the human capacity to experience and act.

The peaceful, naturan way of life is not the expression of a romantic, emotional yearning for nature. Just as little does the rational realisation, that humans will perish with the destruction of the ecological systems, provide a valid motivation which can be extended to an empathy and regard for unique life forms. Both ideas merely represent egocentric perspectives, which rarely take account of the right to life, or the desire for an undisturbed existence and well-being. In contrast, the consideration for animals and plants as individual life forms with a personal interest in life, is the result of an intellectual and psychological development, which has been freed from egocentric prejudice and from the desire to dominate nature. The attitude with which the protection of species, ecological systems and nature itself is treated as an abstract concept, for which individual lives - for whatever seemingly rational reasons - can be sacrificed, is closely connected to the desire to control and dominate.

Humans want to determine which life forms are allowed to live and develop, and they want legitimisation, which allows them to kill that which develops beyond their control. This can sometimes even apply to conservationists when remodeling biotopes12. It is not necessary for humans to purposefully injure and kill animals or plants. Our quality of life is not undermined, if we do without damage to nature and the injury and death of animals and plants. The cause of the human tendency to damage the environment, is not located within existential or economic forces. This can be seen in jainist and buddhist13 cultures14 in which empathy with animals as well as plants (in jainism), prevents injury and death. The practical realisation of animal protection in India, Tibet and other eastern Asian countries can frequently be observed in everyday life. Stepping on small animals is avoided. Beetles and other insects which crawl about on busy paths are moved to the side of the path. As these tiny animals are very delicate, a safe and uncomplicated method exists in which they are allowed to crawl onto a sheet of paper, so they can then be moved without danger of being squashed.
The vegetarian cooking in these countries offer many preparation methods for soya, tofu and other products, which not only replace meat but through superior taste also take away the meaning of ones meat eating habit. The peaceful (naturan) way of life is not to be compared with dogmatic systems. It is not about not eating meat or plants on principle, but is about the existential needs of animals and plants as individual living creatures. One should take into account that they feel pain and suffering when they are injured or killed. The damage of their organism and the causing of a premature death is to be avoided.

Provided that a natural death has occurred, there is no reason to object to the use of meat, pelt, skin/leather and entire plants. The practice of a peaceful way of life leads to an expansion of the egocentric perspective to include the well-being of all living beings. In this way an equality of personal interests and the needs of others is achieved. With the honest and non-judgmental consideration for the lives of plants, animals and people one can arrive at a high quality of life. Especially since through the provision and preparation of products others are not damaged, injured or killed, ones enjoyment of these products is not hampered by conscious or subconscious doubts. Use is only made of materials, which are not dangerous to the health and life of any organism. Risky or dubious additives or production methods are not used.

A way of life through which the lives of plants and animals are preserved is not an enemy to enjoyment and pleasure in life and does in no way lead to a bleak and ascetic lifestyle. Simplicity – as long as the cause is not financial – is an expression of a personal desire to create a quiet and manageable environment. Through the use of foods which have been produced without (intentional) damage and without the injury and death of plants and animals, it is possible to put together a diverse array of meals which are all made with healthy ingredients. The meal suggestions (see Chapter 3) give an impression of the diverse methods of preparation possible. The countless physical therapies and remedies based on minerals, (soya) milk, honey and pollen, as well as fruits and seeds at the moment still offer inexhaustible resources for the manufacture of health products and for the medical treatment of humans, animals and plants. Cosmetics which keep for many years without the use of preservatives and other additives can be made with natural substances such as oils (from seeds – almond oil, avocado oil etc.), beeswax, dairy fats, cocoa butter and other ingredients.

The tendency to cause suffering to people, animals and plants is the result of profound frustration. In this way, psychological injuries which have not been resolved, are passed on to others. This can be verified by observing ones own moods. When in a state of contentment and well-being and especially whilst in a state of happiness, one does not wish suffering or harm upon anyone. Can this experience of balance and well-being be stabilised, the willingness to consciously accept the existential needs of humans as well as animals and plants grows, instead of banishing the ability of others to feel and suffer into the subconscious. (short version)

2.    Foods which can be produced without harming, injuring or killing Animals and Plants

Naturan nutrition does not harm animals and plants and it avoids harmful nutrition practices. It considers the protection of nature and the health and life quality of all living beings as individuals within the range of the
possibilities of human action. In Naturan nutrition, the standard for the choice of foodstuffs, as well as
their production methods, is not only set by human interests but also by the aim not to impair individual living beings and nature as a whole and to take the well being of all live forms in the human food chain equally into
account. Therefore, the main question for problem solving strategies is: "How can the health and quality of life for all living beings involved be ensured?" - concerning food production as well as the fulfillment of existential needs.
Seen from the ethical point of view for "minimizing suffering" there is no objection against using dead bodies or parts of them for food (and other products) if the plants and animals died of a natural death.
There are no fundamental differences in their use and production, except that the life of plants and animals is not artificially ended and that they are not treated as "renewable products" and therefore murdered.
The condition of the aged body is not the problem in processing plants and animals which died of a natural death, as often claimed. This can be balanced by the manner of preparation and taste enhancers even when using
very old living beings.
One problem is the tendency of humans motivated by greed to aid natural death or accidents. To spare a severely injured living being more suffering and, if considering the chances of recovery, a bearable life is no longer possible, it seems justified to end their life as painlessly as possible.
Because natural death is of no importance in food production today and most production methods for foodstuffs of plant and animal origin injure and murder other living beings, it is principally advisable to reduce or avoid the use of meat, rennet, bone, gelatin and whole plant bodies (with exception of fruit, seeds, nuts and grain). As long as injuring and killing remains a matter of course, it is most effective to completely avoid such products. By choosing foods and products, which are produced without harm to plants and animals, the possibility to influence the supply on the market arises. This way better existential conditions can be attained for plants, animals and also for humans. Moreover, the personal mental and psychological development is strengthened and proceeds by the realization of knowledge. If we succeed in practicing respect towards the existential needs of others by
attention and renunciation, the view of the world is changing and a new more vital and stronger feeling for life develops.
The practical realization of a peaceful, Naturan life style with the goal of producing food and other products in a way that humans, animals and plants are not injured or killed can be divided into two parts:
- the choice of food (or further products)
- the methods of cultivation, harvest and production
As a first step we can confine ourselves to food and further products which - theoretically - can be attained without injury or killing. The second step is to improve the living conditions, the animal and plant keeping, harvest and production methods, so that animals and plants can live according to their needs and well being.
When humans practice nutrition without killing or injury, they only take part of the products the animals and plants have created for themselves.
This way animals and plants are not injured; there is no pain inflicted on them and they are not killed. In addition there is the possibility to use animals and plants which died a natural death.
The relation between plants and animals producing food on one hand and humans dependent on them on the other hand can be structured as a symbiosis, in which plants and animals attain advantages by way of care and proper raising in compliance with the needs of the species.
Concerning plant products it is essential to know from which part of the plant a product is obtained.
The whole plant - the roots with the above ground parts - is a living being with a sensitive faculty, whereas no living being has yet developed in the fruit, seeds, grain and nuts. Fruit (also legumes and fruit bearing vegetables), seeds, grain and nuts are the potential offspring of the plant, which only develop their ability to live under favorable conditions (water, light, nutritional soil). We can only speak of a living being, when life already has developed under suitable conditions (compare chap. 1, p 10; chap. 2, p 153).
As long as the fruit and seeds are still connected to the mother plant, they are related to her like a growing embryo, for which the plant takes protective action. Therefore it would be optimal to harvest, when the fruit and seeds are ripe.
The consumer only has indirect influence on the cultivation/production and raising as well as proper raising in compliance with the needs of the species of animals and plants, because they seldom work in agriculture themselves. By buying directly from farms, and buying products from nature protecting production with proper raising, the change towards animal and plant friendly forms of agriculture (compare 10.-10.3.4) can be advanced.
Also the choice of products by criteria of environment compliance (avoiding so called plant-protective agents, artificial fertilizer etc) and proper animal and plant care can set new trends in the direction of the market supply.
Artificially, that is chemically or synthetically, produced "food" is intentionally not covered here. To test its effects on health, animal testing is used. As long as there is any doubt about their tolerance, new tests on animals are carried out.
Physiologically, the body is geared towards using substances, which are dissolved out of their natural mix of constituents in compliance with the individual need of the organism. This is not possible with chemical/synthetic food.
The following 6 groups of food can be won without harming or killing animals or plants:
- milk
- honey and bee pollen
- eggs
- gain, seeds, nuts, fruit, fruit vegetables, pulses, legumes
- salt
- mineral water
The numerous kinds of processing allow for production of almost all standard products, exchanging ethically doubtful food for harmless ones from the groups mentioned above.
For example meat can be substituted by soy, grain or lupine seeds.
Protein from animal origin is taken up from milk, milk products (curdled milk, fresh cheese, cheese - without rennet ferment, butter etc.) and eggs.
For humans who avoid all animals products (vegan nutrition and life style) there is the possibility to exchange milk products with soy products. There are also food products based on soy and grain that can be used instead
of eggs, cheese and cold meat.
In fructational nutrition only fruit, seeds, grain and nuts are eaten.
In Natruran nutrition healthy sweets are not produced with white or cane sugar, because the plants are killed in production. Instead we use sweet fruit, fruit juice (e.g. pear syrup), fruit pulp, pureed dried fruit, honey or fruit sugar.
The numerous kinds of grain can be used to produce bakry wares (bread, cookies, cake etc.), dough based meals (tortellini, pizza, panncakes etc.), pasta, semolina and more.
Fruit are - with a few exceptions - healthiest when eaten raw. They make sweet meals (pancakes, apple pie, fruit soups, casteroles, pasties and more). They can be used in cooked form in jelly (marmelade), as well as for sweetening.
The various kinds of legumes (beans, lintels, peas etc.) and fruit vegetables (tomatoes, bell peppers, zucchini, eggplant, cucumbers etc.) can be used for main courses as well as garnishings. (3. recipies)
These six groups of food contain the oldest and healthiest food stuffs. They contain all nutritional substances, especially proteins (amino acids), vitamins, minerals and trace elements which are necessary for human nutrition. If a person would like to avoid animal protein from milk products and eggs, the combination of plant proteins can cover the requirement of protein through a diverse supply of food.

2.1 Food groups which can be consumed without harming Animals and Plants.

Vegan life style, which avoids all animal products, shows, that it is not essential to use them for human consumption.
However, the existential needs of plants are not considered in veganism.
Veganism accepts that sensitive plants are cut up alive, injured or killed, while using animal products even in a way which does not harm them is rejected, because it is seen as restriction of freedom and oppression.
If the reason for avoidance of certain products is the respect for the living being and harming them should be avoided, then certain living beings should not be excepted in their right for a unharmed existence, and others should not be preferred to their disadvantage.
Harming, injuring and destroying plants in favor of animals living without suffering means that the suffering is transferred to the plants. Because it is difficult for humans to understand the living expressions of plants, it
is easier to ignore their life expressions and to degrade them into unsensing objects. The methods of harvesting plant products (fruit, seeds) are related to taking honey and milk or wool from animals. If animals should not be used to gain raw materials, then the same should apply to the sensing plants. Otherwise, it would not show demonstrate an equal respect for all life forms within possible human range of action.
Because humans have to eat, proper raising with careful production methods, which can be regarded, at worst, as theft (honey, milk), are much easier to accept than injury or killing of living beings.
Naturanism, as described here, uses the life expressions of plants and animals in a aware and respectful way - without intentional injury or killing - where the life quality of the living beings which are cultivated and kept by humans is in the foreground of consideration.

1. Milk and milk products
Mammals produce milk to feed their young. Humans can take part of this food, without causing distress. The requirement for this is a way of raising which is adjusted to the natural conditions, where the calf drinks first and humans take whatever is leftover from the milkable animals.
2. Honey and bee pollen
This food, which is stored by bees, can be taken in measure, so that the beehive is not harmed and gains advantages from the farsighted care of humans.
3. Eggs (from free range chickens)
Each egg, depending on whether it is fertilized or not, contains the possibility of developing a living being, when the egg is brooded. Because the eggs are gathered after laying the development of a sensing being is not possible. With unfertilized eggs this possibility is not even there.
4. Grain, seeds, nuts, fruit, fruit vegetables, pulses, legumes
Grain and seeds contain the ability to develop new live. Grain and seeds constitute no life by definition*. Only when they are brought to sprouting, has a sensing being developed. In nature only a part of the seeds develop and in most all generations there is a large excess of potential offspring.
In fruits, the seed with the possibility of development is covered with the fruit pulp or the seeds are connected with the fruit pulp. When animals eat the fruit pulp and seeds, they excrete the seeds in their wanderings, so that these plants can find new living areas. Most annuals (wheat, rye, barley, oats etc.) are already dead at harvest, so that no sensitive living beings are harmed.
5. Salt
6. (Mineral-)water
*Life = term for all expressions of life of plants, animals and humans, determined by sensitivity, metabolism, propagation and growth.

2.2 Milk and Milk products

The raising of milk producing animals according to economic values has gotten dairy farms and milk processing companies a bad reputation due to the unnatural and painful raising conditions. Animal protection and animal rights organizations have also pointed out the connection between milk and meat production and suggest the avoidance of milk and dairy products. They suggest the use of soymilk and soymilk products.
For the protection of vegetation, goats, sheep, cattle, horses and such should only be kept extensively in the numbers which would be natural for the plant eating free living animals in the individual area. Free living animals which (have to) injure plants for their nutrition appear in any type of vegetation area; when the number of animals kept in the area is unnaturally high the damage is increased. Instead of letting a healthy amount of animals live in proper conditions, the greed for profit causes that milk producing animals are covered too often and they must abort the calves or lambs too often. After birth the young are taken away from them.
The male and the weaker female animals are slaughtered. To increase the production of milk the young animals are raised artificially. They do not have any contact to their mother (or if the biological mother is not available an equivalent substitute) which is so important to mammals, to insure a healthy development. In this context, the effects on behavior resulting from the keeping conditions should be mentioned: e.g. bulls kept with their mother are more peaceful and easier to handle than artificially raised animals, who could never get in contact with older animals but only with other orphaned animals of the same age. It is possible to influence bulls without animal torturing safety precautions. In extreme situations -
e.g. on pastures with lower yield, grasing in steep places which are hard to access, animals raised with their mother are more creative and adaptable.
Mother animals show signs of suffering and pain in their behavior after their young have been taken away. It was found that cows show tear flow after losing their calves.
Torturous raising conditions are neither necessary nor to be justified. Also the profitability which is promised by the branches of industry which profit from this (pharmaceutical industry, branches of construction and sales of stables, accessories etc.) is a miscalculation. This is proven by the high amount of dept in which many farming companies, working in dependence of such industrial products find themselves.
Keeping milk producing animals it is not necessary to increase the milk
production artificially (as the overproduction of milk shows.) Instead there is a demand for high quality milk (low residuals, natural feed) from proper care. Therefore, it is neither necessary to cover cows and sheep too often and abort the calves or lambs, nor to take the young away from their mother animal.
Just as with humans the milk production of cows, sheep, horses and other animals only starts with the raising the young. Then the milk production is stable for approximately the next 2 years and the amount of milk decreases slowly within this time. The amount of milk which is available per day is dependant upon the needs of the young, to which the body of the mother adjusts and produces more or less milk according to the amount consumed.
After the young have fulfilled their need the excess milk can be taken for human consumption, so humans can take part of the milk production of the animals without causing suffering. Because the breeding of high performance animals leads to a too hard strain on the physical condition of the animals.
We will not cover the subject of high performance animals here.
Even highland cattle races which are easy to care for yield 3 liters of excess milk during lactation, which can be used by humans. The keeping of milk producing animals can be changed with comparatively little effort so that the health and quality of life of the animals is given the center of attention (chap. 10.1 and 10.1.4) At the same time the excess can be used for human consumption.

2.3   Honey and Bee Pollen

Bees convert nectar and honeydew into honey by addition of ferments and other active substances. The honey is stored in combs, which can be removed carefully. This is the storage that beekeepers take from. Working with
beehives has to be done extremely careful not to injure or crush any bees.
It would be a worthwhile kind of economics to partake of the honey and pollen storage without exploiting them unscrupulessly.
In the optimal case the relationship between the bees and the beekeeper is a community which gives both parties advantages: the valuable natural products honey and bee pollen can be used for human health and the prudent care of a healthy beehive is supported.

Bee Pollen

Bee pollen is the pollen (the male reproduction cells from blooming plants), which is gathered by the bees and stored in the hive in addition to the honey as a valuable protein containing food.
The bees are covered with the pollen of the flower while collecting honey.
They skillfully brush it together and mix it with honey to form a moldable mass.
The pollen can be gained partially or completely by a "pollen trap" which is installed in front of the exit of the hive. Pollen traps which could injure the bees are unsuitable.

2.4.   Eggs from Free Range chickens

Proper animal raising with enough free range is only given in free range.
Systems of mass production in laying batteries turn the life of the animals
into unbearable torture.
The fertilization of the eggs is dependent on keeping a cock with the chickens In fertilized eggs a living being would start growing after sufficient brooding; a possibility which does not exist in unfertilized eggs. Because the eggs are gathered shortly after laying they are not brooded and no living being can develop.
Chickens and other egg laying animals have very differing needs to brood their eggs and to raise their young.
The amount of eggs laid by older chickens decreases. During their lifetime these animals have produced high quality food as well as the basis for medicine and cosmetics, which was used to the good of humans and possibly
animals. When they turn old they should have the possibility of a quiet live in the environment they are used to. If humans use the life expressions of living beings, they should grant these individuals noticable advantages in return. These advantages include the conditions of keeping, living and movement space similar to natural conditions providing for protection and retreat, high quality care, health care and aging in dignity and the
environment they are used to.
There are substitutes for eggs made from soy or carob. Scrambled egg can be substituted with tofu in soy milk for example.

2.5    Grain, Corn, Kernels, Seeds, Fruits, Fruit vegetables*, Pulses, Legumes

These are products which plants produce for their reproduction. They make up the largest and most diverse group of food. The plants producing seeds and fruit are so numerous, that we could not even start to name them here. Seeds are the potential offspring of the plant. They contain the possibility for development. Only when the seed starts to sprout does a living being develop. Eating seeds and possibly the fruit pulp around them we take away the possibility for a development of a new living being, but we do not cause any harm or suffering, because a conscious, sensing living being has not yet developed.
Contrary to the seed the plant is a conscious living being, which uses its ability of sensing for orientation, the ability which includes the experience of emotions. Emotions - of whichever kind - imply consciousness, which makes the perception of emotion possible.
Plants do not just react mechanically to their environment. This does not exclude them from having additional unvoluntary physical functions, reflexes and automatisms which are not controlled consciously.

* The categoriesof fruit, fruit vegetables, vegetables etc. are not seen as identical but the differ in different cultures.

Emotions are the primary means for orientation of all living beings, which also give information for the maintenance of the organism without mental input. Emotions such as the need to avoid pain/suffering and the strive for well being act life preserving and protect the organism, before the ability to process the experience sets in and also when mental and psychological functions fail.
There is no definition distinguishing animals and plants. There are living beings which take forms between these and can be considered plant as well as animal or they alternate their representation of plant or animal life.
All living beings show the intent to exist without injury and to avoid pain/suffering.
The effort to keep suffering from themselves marks all life forms. In a universe based on cause and effect it is essential to respect and consider the existential needs of other living beings, even if they have a different shape such as animals and plants.
Plants have grown equipmenst which supports the spreading of their offspring: flying objects, which make gliding on the wind possible, barbed hooks and sticky materials give the seed the possibility to stick in the fur of
animals. The addition of fruit pulp causes animals to take up the seed as well, which they excrete in their wanderings.
Fruit pulp is an attractive supply of food for many insects, birds, rodents and mammals (also for humans). This way ,plants manage to persuade the animals to carry their potential offspring to other areas. The fruit pulp is
not useful for the development of the seed itself. Germination can be inhibited by a hard shell (as in kernels and nuts) or by germination
inhibiting substances in the fruit pulp. This way it is possible for the plant species to survive unfavorable periods (e.g. draughts).
During the digestion process in the stomach/intestines of animals and humans the seeds are largely protected from the gastric acid, and sometimes the seeds are only able to germinate after they are separated from the germination inhibiting substances through digestion of the fruit pulp (e.g. tomatoes). The seeds which passed the intestinal tract intact reach the soil [or another place] together with other digested material, which provides fertilizer. There they can germinate and develop if conditions are favorable.
Some plants specialized in their propagation on the use of animals.
Mistletoe, a plant living on trees, provides its seeds with glue substances. The seeds have to be carried to other treetops and stuck to the bark. The berries of mistletoe are taken up by some kinds of birds such as the thrush.
The seeds either pass through the intestines of the bird and reach the branches of the tree together with other excrements or the glue substances stick the berry to the beak of the bird. When the bird whets its beak the seed is put onto a branch where it sticks and can germinate.
During evolution, plants and animals have created cooperative behavior patterns, by which the (food) plants propagate. The existential conditions
are given by the plants which produce the oxygen necessary for animals and humans and who also take care of their needs of food (nectar, fruit pulp).
Plants usually produce seeds in excessive amounts, to take care not only of varying development conditions but also of the preferences of many insects, fungi, bacteria, birds, rodents and mammals - including humans - who
appreciate the seeds and the fruit pulp as valuable food.
Plants are able to care for animals and humans by their supply of oxygen, fruit pulp and seeds, so that further nutrition besides water would not be absolutely necessary. Therefore there is no need to injure or kill living plant beings.
Humans owe all of their existence to this advance of work of the plants.
Without the oxygen which is produced by plants they would not be able to live longer than a few minutes. Still humans are hardly thankful to the plants, they do not respect their existential needs, but they injure and kill the living beings which create the possibility of animal and human life. In agriculture and in horticulture, methods are wide spread that consciously use the pain sensitivity and the fear of death of plants to increase the harvest. If plants feel fear (of their lives) through injury or existential deficiency they act just like parents of animals and humans; they offer their main supply of energy to the chances of survival of their young. By injuring the plant organism (cutting of branches etc.) and artificial water deficit (e.g. in rice cultivation) plants are put into a
mood of panic. Because their own life is threatened they give a large part of their energy to the development of their offspring, so that they are qualitatively and quantitatively promoted.
If plants are under stress, their reactions are called "emergency reaction". The results of their stress experience are "fear fruit" and "emergency sprouts". "Emergency sprouts" and "fear fruit" as well as "hyperfructification", results in qualitative and quantitative excessive production of fruit, develops when plants show emergency reactions to existential threats (injury, droughts, acid rain etc.). To cause panic reactions in plants with the goal to increase the harvest as well as numerous cultivation methods (sterile strains) and the uncalculable risk of genetic technology are neither necessary (destruction of excess harvest) nor are they developed and used to help the hungry. A large amount of the harvest is destroyed in order to artificially maintain a higher market value. The consumer would appreciate lower prices and also the hungry, because fruit are easy to preserve and seeds last for years. Instead of financing the destruction of this food, the cost could be used to preserve them and transport them to the poor areas of the world. But strains of grain are bred for instance, which can not reproduce themselves (sterile strains), so that the consumer becomes dependent on the commercial seed
producing companies, because they cannot raise new plants from their own harvest.
The use of genetic technology, (of which the danger is hard to evaluate) is not intended to get rid of the hunger of the world, but for the commercial use of patented living beings by large companies that strive for maximum profit. Today the conditions of cultivation and care of plants are geared towards the use of plant life for human interests. Proper cultivation and harvest methods which are oriented towards the existential and development interests of the plants (as fully respected, sensing, living beings) are still very rare today. But the common approach to animals and humans (as well as nature herself) shows considerable deficits concerning respect and the willingness to consider the needs of others.
In optimal cases, fruit and seeds are harvested when the ripening process is finished and the mother plant separates itself from its offspring. Before fruit or leaves fall the plant builds an inner layer of cork like cells.
The constituents in seeds and fruit are best tolerated by human health when the state of full ripening under the influence of sunlight has been reached.
Completely ripe fruit are storable and transportable as well. The duration of storage is dependent on the kind of fruit and can extend form a few days to several months depending upon the storage conditions.

Seeds, grain, kernels and legumes with high nutritional value such as beans, peas and lintels.
The existential needs of plants can be considered during the harvest of seeds and fruit as well. Just like humans and animals, plants want to live their life cycle uninjured through to the natural end.
The fruit bearing plant separates itself from its offspring. They produce rather large amounts of fruit and seeds by themselves, so that there is no need to cause emergency reactions by artificially injuring them (abuse by
cutting back of fruit bearing trees). Bee hives can increase the harvest naturally. The harvest of annual grain (wheat, oats, rye, barley etc.) does not harm the mother plant, because the life cycle has ended by harvest time.
When the grain is ripe the stalks are dry. The life span of other annuals is ended naturally by the seasonal changes between cold and warm periods. It provides for the needs of the plants to let them live until winter and this is to the advantage of nature and agriculture. The layer of vegetation offers protection to animals, it improves the quality of the ground and prevents erosion damage.

2.5.1   Possibilities of Utilisation and Processing Methods

The names of the mentioned fruit and seeds are group terms. Here we give a
small selection as an example.

Grain (wheat, rye, oats, barley, spelt etc.)
We will consider whole grain products here. Their full of value in the sense of vitamins, nutritional and mineral substances as well as fiber is still mostly present, and is kept as unchanged as possible by preparation (opposed to denaturated food). Products which can be prepared are:
Bakery goods and dough products of all kinds: bread, cookies, cakes, whole
grain noodles, dumplings, pizza dough, semiola, grits etc.
All kinds of grain can also be eaten boiled (like rice), stewed or fried, as well as in the form of flower soups (from coarse or finely sieved flower)

Fruit trees, berry bushes, fruit bearing plants
(Selection of widely known and distributed plants as well as some possible uses)

Fruit
apple
orange
avocado
banana
pear
black rasberry
bread fruit
citrus fruit
dates
durian
rowan
figs
pomegranate
grape fruit
guajave
rose hip
blueberry
red rasberry
elderberry
currants
carob
cherry
kiwi
raisins
lime
longan
lychee
tangerine
mango
manna
maracuya
melon
yellow plum
medlar
papaya
passion fruit
plum
peach
cranberry
olive
quince
reineclaude
sloe
goose berry
tamarillo
tamarinde
grapes
whitethorn berry
lemon

Possibilities of preparation:
dried fruit, syrup, fruit juice, fruit wine, marmelade, jelly, fruit soups, fruit pudding, fruit ice cream, fruit casserole, fruit tea, fruit sugar, fruit bread and as addition to all kinds of baked goods.

Seeds and nuts
cashew
acorn
chestnuts, maroni
coconut
almonds (marcipane)
poppy seeds
linen seeds
lupine seeds
brazil nut
pecans
pine seeds
pistachios
sesame seeds
sun flower seeds
walnuts

Fruit vegetables
avocado
tomato
cucumber
pumpkin
bell peppers
egg plant
zucchini

Legumes, Pulses
beans (numerous kinds) never eat beans raw!
peas
lintels
coco beans
coffee beans
carob fruit

Possibilities of preparation
soups, puree, boiled, fried, stewed and baked.

Selection of popular spices, which can be harvested as seeds or fruit
anis
cardamom
chilly peppers
marsh mallow
fennel
glutamin (sodium glutamate)
coriander
carraway
nutmeg
peperoni
paprica
pepper (the white pepper is produced from ripened berries, whereas the black pepper is produced from green berries harvested too early)
sesame
mustard seeds
vanilla (from vanilla beans)
star anis
juniper berries

grease and oils
butter fat
coconut oil, coconut grease
linseed oil
palm oil, palm seed grease
sesame oil
soy oil
olive oil
sunflower oil

2.6 Salt
Salt (NaCl, Sodium chloride) is gained from salt mines, saline springs and on ocean beaches. In salt mines rock salt is produced, which is purified and sold as table salt on the market.

2.7 (Mineral) water
Water is the most important foodstuff. Humans could not survive more than 3 to 4 days without it. It is the basis substance of the cells and functions as transport and solving agent.

3. Meals

In the compilation of the following selection of meals, the main criterion to be considered was that the ingredients were not difficult or complicated to obtain. Basically, almost all conventional dishes can be prepared by simply replacing the elements, which have been gained through the injury and death of a living organism, with alternative components. In this exchange, one must make sure that no plant or animal was harmed in the production of these foods. Meat, for example, can be substituted with Soy alternatives, Tofu or grain and nut roasts. Instead of leafy, stem or root vegetables, fruits, pulses and legumes can be used.

The menu section can only provide a glimpse of the many possibilities available. The lists of meals are mainly intended to offer initial stimulation for ones own imagination and creativity.

A diet of foods, which has preserved the lives of both animals and plants, need not be bland nor boring. This is visible in the following selection of over 365 different meals. It is possible therefore, to serve a different dish for every day of the year. One can also alter the flavour of each of the suggested menus through slight modification, i.e. the addition or subtraction of individual ingredients.
When it comes to the vegetables, the question arises as to which part of the plant should be used. Leaf, stalk and root constitute the sensitive living organism, which is injured or killed, despite the large diversity of foods available whithout harm to plants or animals. These foods (for example fruits, seeds and nuts) are perfectly adequate. In the case of the provision of food and other necessities, as in all areas of life, there is no clear definition of ethically unobjectionable behaviour, there are only gradual transitions.

It is important, for a lifestyle to be ankered in reality, not to let rigid dogmas rule ones behaviour. One should instead, attempt to grasp the singularity of each situation, and keep this in mind as far as possible, while making the decisions which lead to ones ultimate goal- the regard for the wellbeing of all living creatures. The meat of animals and parts of the living organism of plants are used excessively in the production of foodstuffs. In the process, large amounts of food are collected, which are subsequently thrown out or destroyed. There is no reason why foods should not be used which would otherwise be destroyed (including those parts of the plant or animal organism which has died of natural causes). That is, as long as this does not support, or promote, the injury or death of a living creature in any way.
If special-offer meat products or leafy greens and root vegetables which have passed their sell-by date are bought, or if others are encouraged to slaughter or buy those animal or vegetable products, which have been gained through death and injury, this in itself implies support for death and injury. Each purchase can be judged as an instruction by consumers to damage the health and kill further living creatures.

In the use of present, still generally accepted harvesting methods, the pain and suffering of the affected
organism is ignored. A change in methods of cultivation, care and harvesting which favour a good quality of life for the plants and animals involved, would be a step further towards a relationship of mutual respect with other forms of life.

An attempt was made in the menu section, to primarily suggest meals, in which the ingredients have been gained through the use of gentle harvesting methods. Included in this are annual crops which, with the exception of >greenkernel<, are in general only harvested when their one year life-span has come to an end. If the grains are fully ripend, one will see that the mother plant is already 'straw yellow', dessicated and is no longer alive when cut. Maize, in contrast, which is also annual, is usually harvested too early. The parent plant is still green, still living and during the harvest must suffer its own destruction. An equally valid possibility would be to leave the plants in the soil, until their natural death. Just as habitual and cruel practices in the livestock industries are defended with specious arguments, in the attempt to avoid confrontation with ones own dubious actions, attempts are being made to ligitimise the injury and death of plants in the name of profitability.

Rice, buckwheat and millet also have a one year life-span and can simply be harvested when they have died naturally and are dried out. Thus they will have completed their natural lifecycle - which is, of course, what all humans would like to expect for themselves.
Different forms of life also suffer when subjected to tortuos living conditions, just like us humans, and would like to avoid their own painful destruction.
Compassion for the countless victims of the human diet and lifestyle, aswell as sadness for the inflicted suffering, provide a strong motivation to act. Beginning in ones own life, one can prioritise those available products and foods, which have definitively been produced without harm to others. Despite the defective agricultural procedures which are still in place, one can make progress in limiting oneself to 'naturan' foodstuffs.

Potato plants, for example, are not annual. They have a life-span of several years. The shoots, which grow above ground, only blossom in the second year and then produce berries through which they propagate. The potatos themselves are swollen tubers, in which the plant stores starch, aswell as vitamins and minerals.
In the attempt to live in such a way, that the life of others is left unscathed, one must differentiate between consistent action and clear yet appropriate demands on the one hand and dogmatic inflexibility on the other. It doubtlessly seems easier to set up certain rules, to be followed mindlessly, without at the same time taking into account the historical uniqueness of each situation. Rules, however,
are merely an aid and, as an oversimplification, necessarily embody an increased rigidity. They also show a lack of willingness to acknowledge the particularities of each situation, if even temporarily.
Inflexibility - especially within particular intellectual ideas and the accompanying emotions, are in stark contrast to the natural flow, the processes and movement of life, which governs all existence.

Rules can be seen as a helping hand, to perhaps simplify the changeover to the preferred dietary and behavioural habits. Principles can provide helpful support, above all in the company of those whose belief system has not, or is in the initial stages of, progressing towards a respect for other living beings. These same principles can, however, develop into hurdles. That is, if they lose their guiding function or become self serving or a means to attaining social prestige. It is possible to deduce the extent and direction of an individuals' development from their practice of a compassionate lifestyle, or on the other hand, their varying degrees of blindness towards ignorance. Life, with its' many fluctuating influences, continuously challenges ones intellectual and psychological development. Thus, as the entire universe down to its' smallest known particles, is constantly in flux, a retreat into dogma and rules necessarily negates the endless flow of life.
The art lies in the expression of compassion and understanding in consistent behaviour, without arresting intellectual and psychological development.

In the choice of food (as well as in the use of other products), situations always arise in which one is painfully aware of the unnecessary suffering that has been caused through human failure, laziness and misdirection. Ones own personal powers of influence and decision seem terribly small and meaningless when confronted with the inconceivable suffering that man inflicts consciously, unconsciously or just irresponsibly. Despite this, the 'achievments of man' as well as several social processes exist because of these diverse individual achievments. Whenever one consciously chooses a product gained whithout harm, with the aim of respecting the needs of others, this in itself becomes a demonstration of values. The end result of any life is a jigsaw, made up of many small pieces. Intentions as well as attempts to demonstrate respect, understanding and consideration develop into pleasant memories and become embedded in ones thoughts and emotions.
Tasty and healthy meals convince us through their quality and can help awaken interest in a lifestyle, which is based on the care and protection of all other forms of life.


3. Meals

In the compilation of the following selection of meals, the main criterion to be considered was that the ingredients were not difficult or complicated to obtain. Basically, almost all conventional dishes can be prepared by simply replacing the elements, which have been gained through the injury and death of a living organism, with alternative components. In this exchange, one must make sure that no plant or animal was harmed in the production of these foods. Meat, for example, can be substituted with Soy alternatives, Tofu or grain and nut roasts. Instead of leafy, stem or root vegetables, fruits, pulses and legumes can be used.

The menu section can only provide a glimpse of the many possibilities available. The lists of meals are mainly intended to offer initial stimulation for ones own imagination and creativity.

A diet of foods, which has preserved the lives of both animals and plants, need not be bland nor boring. This is visible in the following selection of over 365 different meals. It is possible therefore, to serve a different dish for every day of the year. One can also alter the flavour of each of the suggested menus through slight modification, i.e. the addition or subtraction of individual ingredients.
When it comes to the vegetables, the question arises as to which part of the plant should be used. Leaf, stalk and root constitute the sensitive living organism, which is injured or killed, despite the large diversity of foods available whithout harm to plants or animals. These foods (for example fruits, seeds and nuts) are perfectly adequate. In the case of the provision of food and other necessities, as in all areas of life, there is no clear definition of ethically unobjectionable behaviour, there are only gradual transitions.

It is important, for a lifestyle to be ankered in reality, not to let rigid dogmas rule ones behaviour. One should instead, attempt to grasp the singularity of each situation, and keep this in mind as far as possible, while making the decisions which lead to ones ultimate goal- the regard for the wellbeing of all living creatures. The meat of animals and parts of the living organism of plants are used excessively in the production of foodstuffs. In the process, large amounts of food are collected, which are subsequently thrown out or destroyed. There is no reason why foods should not be used which would otherwise be destroyed (including those parts of the plant or animal organism which has died of natural causes). That is, as long as this does not support, or promote, the injury or death of a living creature in any way.
If special-offer meat products or leafy greens and root vegetables which have passed their sell-by date are bought, or if others are encouraged to slaughter or buy those animal or vegetable products, which have been gained through death and injury, this in itself implies support for death and injury. Each purchase can be judged as an instruction by consumers to damage the health and kill further living creatures.

In the use of present, still generally accepted harvesting methods, the pain and suffering of the affected
organism is ignored. A change in methods of cultivation, care and harvesting which favour a good quality of life for the plants and animals involved, would be a step further towards a relationship of mutual respect with other forms of life.

An attempt was made in the menu section, to primarily suggest meals, in which the ingredients have been gained through the use of gentle harvesting methods. Included in this are annual crops which, with the exception of >greenkernel<, are in general only harvested when their one year life-span has come to an end. If the grains are fully ripend, one will see that the mother plant is already 'straw yellow', dessicated and is no longer alive when cut. Maize, in contrast, which is also annual, is usually harvested too early. The parent plant is still green, still living and during the harvest must suffer its own destruction. An equally valid possibility would be to leave the plants in the soil, until their natural death. Just as habitual and cruel practices in the livestock industries are defended with specious arguments, in the attempt to avoid confrontation with ones own dubious actions, attempts are being made to ligitimise the injury and death of plants in the name of profitability.

Rice, buckwheat and millet also have a one year life-span and can simply be harvested when they have died naturally and are dried out. Thus they will have completed their natural lifecycle - which is, of course, what all humans would like to expect for themselves.
Different forms of life also suffer when subjected to tortuos living conditions, just like us humans, and would like to avoid their own painful destruction.
Compassion for the countless victims of the human diet and lifestyle, aswell as sadness for the inflicted suffering, provide a strong motivation to act. Beginning in ones own life, one can prioritise those available products and foods, which have definitively been produced without harm to others. Despite the defective agricultural procedures which are still in place, one can make progress in limiting oneself to 'naturan' foodstuffs.

Potato plants, for example, are not annual. They have a life-span of several years. The shoots, which grow above ground, only blossom in the second year and then produce berries through which they propagate. The potatos themselves are swollen tubers, in which the plant stores starch, aswell as vitamins and minerals.
In the attempt to live in such a way, that the life of others is left unscathed, one must differentiate between consistent action and clear yet appropriate demands on the one hand and dogmatic inflexibility on the other. It doubtlessly seems easier to set up certain rules, to be followed mindlessly, without at the same time taking into account the historical uniqueness of each situation. Rules, however,
are merely an aid and, as an oversimplification, necessarily embody an increased rigidity. They also show a lack of willingness to acknowledge the particularities of each situation, if even temporarily.
Inflexibility - especially within particular intellectual ideas and the accompanying emotions, are in stark contrast to the natural flow, the processes and movement of life, which governs all existence.

Rules can be seen as a helping hand, to perhaps simplify the changeover to the preferred dietary and behavioural habits. Principles can provide helpful support, above all in the company of those whose belief system has not, or is in the initial stages of, progressing towards a respect for other living beings. These same principles can, however, develop into hurdles. That is, if they lose their guiding function or become self serving or a means to attaining social prestige. It is possible to deduce the extent and direction of an individuals' development from their practice of a compassionate lifestyle, or on the other hand, their varying degrees of blindness towards ignorance. Life, with its' many fluctuating influences, continuously challenges ones intellectual and psychological development. Thus, as the entire universe down to its' smallest known particles, is constantly in flux, a retreat into dogma and rules necessarily negates the endless flow of life.
The art lies in the expression of compassion and understanding in consistent behaviour, without arresting intellectual and psychological development.

In the choice of food (as well as in the use of other products), situations always arise in which one is painfully aware of the unnecessary suffering that has been caused through human failure, laziness and misdirection. Ones own personal powers of influence and decision seem terribly small and meaningless when confronted with the inconceivable suffering that man inflicts consciously, unconsciously or just irresponsibly. Despite this, the 'achievments of man' as well as several social processes exist because of these diverse individual achievments. Whenever one consciously chooses a product gained whithout harm, with the aim of respecting the needs of others, this in itself becomes a demonstration of values. The end result of any life is a jigsaw, made up of many small pieces. Intentions as well as attempts to demonstrate respect, understanding and consideration develop into pleasant memories and become embedded in ones thoughts and emotions.
Tasty and healthy meals convince us through their quality and can help awaken interest in a lifestyle, which is based on the care and protection of all other forms of life.



3.1   Meal Suggestions

 

Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce

Hardboiled Eggs with Sweet and Sour Sauce

Deep-fried Rolls of Pastry with a Vegetable Filling

Apple Cereal (cooked) with Almond Shavings

Lentil Soup

Deep-Fried Vegetable Balls

Tortellini filled with Tofu

Rice Omelette

Lasagne with minced Soya

Wholegrain Soup with Peppers

Pasta Roll with Vegetable Mash

Tofu Steak with Mango Mousse

Glass Noodle Soup with Peas

Soya Kebabs with grilled Aubergine

Lentil Patties with Cucumber Salad

Butter Beans (boiled and mashed) with Fromage Frais and Cumin

Breaded Sheep’s Cheese with Peppers and Soya Bean Mash

Sweet and Sour Pumpkin Soup

Green Bean Stew with Aubergine

Vegetable Pie

Chick Pea Bake with Peppers, Tomato and Cucumber

Vegetable Strudel

Pea Soup

Spelt Patties

Semolina Dumplings

Stuffed Courgette

Egg Soufflé with Almond Shavings, Fennel Seeds and Rice Noodles

Spelt Soup with Croutons

Steamed Avocado

Baked Sheep’s Cheese with Slices of Kiwi and Pumpkin

Savoury Pancakes with Vegetables, Cheese and Soy Sauce

Mango and Bean Pie with Paprika Sauce

Peppers stuffed with Rice

Toast with breaded Tofu, tomato and melon slices

Macaroni Cheese

Breaded Vegetables with various dips

Fried Butter Beans with Pepperoni

Pepper Soup

Hot Vegetable Pudding with Yeast Dumplings

Soya Steak with Coconut Sauce

Blueberry Soup with Vanilla Sauce

Tortellini filled with Cheese

Baked Tomatoes with a Rice and Soya Mince Filling

Cheese and Courgette Soup

Breaded Vegetables with Tomato Sauce

Pasta with Vegetables and Strips of Tofu in a Pan

Chick Pea Mash with hardboiled Eggs

Vegetable Soup with Semolina Dumplings

Rice Bake with Cucumber, Tomato and Aubergine

Ravioli with a Cheese Filling

Courgette Stew with Wild Rice

Breaded Cheese, served with Cranberries

Bean Puree with Soy Sauce

Lentil Stew with Slices of Courgette

Hot Cherry Compote with Vanilla Sauce

Rice Balls with Crème Fraiche

Tofu Spring Rolls

Vegetable Pies

Steamed Courgette with Goats Cheese

Semolina in Slices, served with Fruit Compote

Pizza Margherita, topped with tomato, peppers, courgette and cheese

Fried Eggs with Wild Rice, peas and fried tomato slices with soy sauce

Spaghetti with Cream Cheese

Noodle Schnitzel: seasoned noodles with egg or other binding agent, breaded in the style of a schnitzel

Hardboiled Eggs in Mustard Sauce

Bread Dumplings, served with Peas and a light Sauce

Puff Pastries with a Vegetable Filling

Soya Meat Pieces, served with rice and zucchini in a light sauce

Butter Bean Stew

Courgette Omelette

Ravioli filled with Tofu

Pancakes filled with Cheese and Melon Pieces, sprinkled with chopped pistachios and pine nuts

Barley Bake made with boiled barley, cucumber and cheese

Home made Red Noodles (coloured with tomato puree) with olives, mung beans and crumbled cheese

Eggs in Courgette Cream Sauce

Pasta Shapes with Tofu Fricassee and Pumpkin

Soya Meat Ragout with Rice and Green Beans

Cheese Kebabs with Olives and Tofu

Quiche with Fromage Frais and Vegetables

Courgette Cake with Soya Mince

Fromage Frais Dumplings with a Kiwi Sauce

Omelette with Vegetables of the Season

Pastry Roulade with Sandwich Spread

Aubergine and Courgette Stew

Mixed Vegetable Platter, garnished with hardboiled eggs and pistachio nuts

Rye Cakes with roasted Pine Nuts and semi-grain rice

Steamed Rice with Vegetable Balls

Cheese Rissoles with chopped Peppers

Barley Soup with Lentils and Peas

Smoked Tofu with deep fried wholegrain Strips

Braised Courgette, with rice, fried spicy cucumber and tomato slices

Rice Soup with Vegetables

Tomato-Courgette Pizza with olives and goats cheese

Semolina Dumplings in Breadcrumbs with sweet and sour Vegetables

Soya Meat in a Pan with Pasta Spirals, Peppers, Tomato, Peas, and pieces of mango

Vegetable Bake with breadcrumbs

Hardboiled Eggs in Pepper and Tomato Sauce

Wholegrain and Nut Rissoles with Rice and a Cheese Sauce

Deep-fried Chick Pea Balls with cream sauce

Chilli with Tofu, Soya-Meat and Vegetables in a Pan

Pasta Terrine with Vegetables of the Season

Aubergine Stew, first fry the aubergines in glutamine

Cucumber filled with Rice and Tomatoes, sprinkled with cheese and then baked

Fried Avocados

Spelt Soup with Cheese

Filled Pastry Rolls with Olives and Chinese Glass Noodles

Baked Barley Balls

Tofu and Vegetable Pie with Nutmeg

Spicy Pepper and Pepperoni Bake

Red Currant Omelette with fresh Fruit, garnished with cream sauce

Deep Fried Rice Balls in Pepper Sauce

Poppy Seed Dumplings with Raisins

Wholegrain Bake with Cheese

Tomato Gratin with hardboiled Eggs and Cheese

Egg Ragout with Rice and fresh Peas

Soya Meatballs in Tomato Sauce with Rice

Pasta with Avocado Pieces in a Marinade

Bean Bake with Tomatoes and Olives

Chick Pea Stew

Steamed Aubergines with Pasta Spirals

Cheese ‘Spaetzle’

Bread Bake with Carob and Nut and Cream Sauce

Steamed Cucumber Pieces in a Sauce of curdled Milk

Pasta Shells with Peppers and Cheese in Breadcrumbs

Spaghetti with Fruit Vegetable Puree

Pasta Shapes with Tofu

Wholegrain Lasagne, filled with peas and tomatoes

Chick Pea Mash with avocado slices and other vegetables in spicy tomato sauce

Lentil Stew with smoked Tofu

Baked Avocado with Cucumber Sauce

Dumplings stuffed with cooked plums, and croutons

Fried Soya Meat with Green Beans and Rice, served with a sauce of tomato puree, cream and soy sauce, seasoned with glutamine, pepper and paprika

Dumplings with Raisin Sauce

Fruit Vegetable Tartlets

Aubergines stuffed with Rice, Tofu and Cream Cheese

Bread Kebabs (squares of different types of Bread are spread with Butter, Tomato Ketchup, Mustard and Cheese and alternated with Courgette, Apple and Cheese Slices)

Courgette stuffed with Goats Cheese

Lentil Pockets stuffed with cubes of tofu

Soya Fricassee with Wild Rice

Hardboiled Eggs with chilli sauce

Amaranth Cakes, Amaranth=seed carrying, usually annual plants, also called ‘the wheat of the Incas’.  Cannot botanically be termed a grain.

Puff Pastry filled with pickled broad beans and fried soya meat

Tagliatelle with Tofu and pepper sauce

Rice with Peas and Kefir Sauce

Fried Fruit Vegetables in a Marinade, with pasta shells

Tubes of Pasta filled with Dried Fruit

Cheese-pudding:  pieces of cheese, butter, milk, whipped egg yolk, beaten egg white and oat flakes are mixed in a pudding dish, seasoned with salt, glutamine and nutmeg and cooked in a Bain Marie

Spicy Fromage Frais Puffs with Vegetables

Steamed Papaya sprinkled with lemon or lime juice

Raclette: each pan is filled from a selection of raw fruit vegetables, various types of cooked beans, fried soya meat, tofu strips and cheese.  This goes well with various sauces, pita bread, and a salad of fresh fruit vegetables.

Stacked Pancakes with Plum Compote or other jam (allow whole grain flour, eggs, cream and honey or fructose to soak, then bake thin, round pancakes. Alternate layers of pancake with layers of compote.  This goes well with a red- or white wine sauce.

Soya meat Schnitzel, with an apple crust

Halved Boiled Eggs with Cherry Tomatoes in a light sauce

Grilled Vegetable Kebabs, served with pasta in a walnut sauce

Soya Mince Pasta Roll, stuffed with green peas and mango

Vegetable Pudding with Soya Mince

Tofu Ragout with Aubergines and Black Olives

Lasagne with Peppers, sprinkled with pine nuts and sunflower seeds

Baked Beef Tomatoes with Cream Cheese and Bean Mash

Chick Pea Terrine with Cumin, Sesame and Pistachios

Poached Eggs in Cayenne Pepper Sauce

Wholegrain Patties in Butter Sauce

Fondue with Fruit Vegetable Pieces and Roasted Bread

Wild Rice with Date Sauce and Peas

Fettuccine Soup

Wholegrain Strudel with sheep’s cheese and bean mash

Gnocchi with Goats Cheese (flour, fromage frais, eggs, cream and grated hard cheese are mixed and made into small dumplings, filled with goats cheese and boiled)

Deep fried Vegetable Balls with Rice

Stuffed Apples: hollow out the apples, sprinkle with lemon juice, filling: soya mince, paprika, pepper, salt and glutamine

Braised Cucumber with Chick Peas, served with a lemon and butter sauce

Tofu Pie on Toast

Wholegrain Ravioli filled with Semolina and Cream Cheese

Steamed Beef Tomatoes, served with fried whole grains (previously cooked) and olives

Peeled Barley Soup

Fried Slices of Soya Sausage with Pasta and Peas

Egg and Avocado Soufflé

Peppered Tomato Soup

Red Lentil Soup with Tofu and Pepper Strips

Cheese Soup with Tomato and Courgette

Stuffed Pasta Rolls covered with Cheese and baked

Soya Beans with Tofu in a Pan

Pecan Nut and Courgette Soup

Bean and Pea Pies

Soya Ragout in a Ring of Rice

Buckwheat Noodles with Chick Peas

Black Bean Soup with Pepperoni and Peppers

Soya Pieces with Kiwi, served with curls of courgette

Soya Schnitzel with Breadcrumbs, served with Wholegrain Noodles and Peppers

Poached Eggs with mashed Peas

Chick Pea Dumplings, fried and served with a sauce of tomatoes and peppers

Cheese and Fromage Frais Biscuits (fromage frais, hard cheese and flour are formed into pancakes. Goes well with pasta)

Soya Meatballs in Mustard Sauce

Poppy Seed and Almond Pasta (ground poppy seeds and freshly chopped almonds which have been roasted briefly in a pan without oil, are added to the pasta.  Goes well with Crème Fraiche).

Semolina Soufflé with Mango Puree

Wholegrain Soup, coarsely ground with vegetables gently roasted in a pan

The coarsely ground grains are roasted gently with butter, salt and glutamine.  It can also be cooked without roasting.

Cream of Courgette Soup with Croutons

Aubergine and Courgette Bake

Fried Green Beans with Brown Rice, fresh Vegetables, served with a kefir dressing with lemon juice, fructose, salt and pepper

Lentil Bake with brown Rice, served with sweet and sour peppers

Hardboiled Eggs, halved and served on a bed of pea and tofu risotto

Couscous with fried pieces of Fruit Vegetables and Soya Meat

(Couscous is wheat semolina, treated with steam, which comes onto the market after it has been cooked, dried and cracked)

Kidney Bean Omelette

Butter Bean Soup with Pieces of Soya meat

Slices of Tofu with a Sesame Seed and Apple Crust

Courgette Bake covered with Cheese and baked, served with tomato sauce

Pepper and Tomato Quiche

Tofu Pies

Kiwi Fruit Soup with Semolina Dumplings

Multi-coloured sweet and sour Lentil Stew, made of various types of lentil, e.g. green, red, yellow and brown lentils

‘Egg and Fire’ Stew: all the ingredients are fried briefly in hot oil with the hardboiled eggs, pepperoni and chopped peppers and then cooked with the chillies, black beans and glutamine

Peach-Amaranth: the amaranth is cooked with pieces of peach, milk, thickened fruit juice, fructose or honey and a vanilla pod

Soya Mince Pudding: the soya mince is mixed with dry bread which has been soaked, different coloured peppers and eggs, filled into a pudding dish and cooked in a Bain Marie

Cannelloni al Forno: filled pasta rolls, covered in cheese and baked

Pasta Bake: boiled pasta is filled into an oven dish with butter, flour, water, cheese and egg, beaten egg white is folded into it and chopped vegetables are added

Mixed Grain Pasta with Pepper Sauce

Grain Patties in Coconut Sauce

Courgette Soup with Cheese and Semolina Dumplings

Pancakes with Tofu and Tomatoes, served with strips of fresh vegetables

Steamed Avocado in a Caper Sauce, served with soya beans

Vegetable Ratatouille

Brown Rice Patties in Tomato Sauce, served with a barley pita bread

Colourful Tofu Risotto with various pulses

Fruit Bake

Steamed Avocado, filled with walnuts and sprinkled with lemon juice

Cheese Soup

Bread Dumplings

Pumpkin Soup

Cheese Dumplings in Breadcrumbs, stuffed with mandarin pieces, served with pasta spirals and green peas

Amaranth with fried Vegetables, tofu and red pepper sauce

Baked Soft Cheese, with Cranberries

Various Vegetables, filled with spicy dough

Fried or grilled Soya Sausages with mashed Peas

Slices of Tofu in a sweet and sour Sauce on a bed of Rice Noodles, served with beans

Cheese Dumplings

Puff Pastry Torteletts with various Fillings

Hardboiled Eggs, baked, with Cheese

Tofu Dumplings in a light sauce, with peas



3.2   Drinks

 

Mineral Water

Fruit Juices, Multivitamin Juice

Fruit Spritzers: if possible freshly pressed fruit juice, diluted with some water

Coconut Milk

Milk, Buttermilk and soured Milk

Yoghurt Drinks

Soured Milk Refresher: the soured milk is blended with cold water (crushed ice) and fruit juice

Whey, natural or with Fruit Juice, for example Whey with Orange

Mixed Fruit Drinks, e.g. Kiwi juice with crushed ice, thickened Apple and Pear Juice

Cereal Milk: ground cereals are boiled, strained and sweetened with fructose, honey or fruit juice

Soya Milk, natural or with added chocolate, vanilla or fruit juice

Milk with Fruit, e.g. strawberry milk or almond milk

Energy Drink: - suitable to increase strength during convalescence – raw milk, freshly pressed fruit juice, a raw egg (this must be fresh, i.e. must have been laid the same day), honey, 1-2 spoons of soya flour and freshly ground nuts.  Blend the ingredients.

Fromage Frais Drink: mix some fromage frais with cold water, add crushed ice, blueberries (squashed), fructose or honey

Fruit and Seed Teas (without the use of leaves, twigs or roots)

Cocoa husk Tea

Rosehip Tea

Fruit Tea

Apple Tea

Blackberry Tea

Lime Tree Blossom Tea

Fennel (seed) Tea

Coriander Tea

Lemon Tea

Aniseed Tea

Rice Tea: approx. 4 spoons of rice per litre of water. Roast the rice in a pan, cook for 10 minutes and then strain.

Cocoa

Carob: cocoa-like Drink which consists of ground carob.  The carob powder contains natural sugar.

Coffee: the effects of caffeinated coffee on the body can lead to an accustomisation similar to an addiction.  Withdrawal symptoms such as headaches, tiredness and irritability can occur.

Cereal Coffee made from roasted cereals, without chicory root

Acorn Coffee

Beech Nut Coffee

Guarana: stimulating drink made from fruit

Alcoholic Drinks are controversial stimulants, as there is a danger of an addiction (alcoholism) which can jeopardise health.  Alcoholic beverages exist which have been made from  unobjectionable ingredients (fruits etc.).  In the use of grain (for example barley) the grains should not be brought to seed.  The sensitive seedlings have several characteristics of a living being which would like to exist as a plant.

Natural Wine: can be produced within only one day in hot climates.  Grapes and/or other fruit pieces are left standing in the sun in a sealed glass container.  The fermentation process begins after just a few hours.  The alcoholic pulp is filtered and cold water, thickened fruit juice, fructose or honey are added to taste.

Apart from in the production of natural wine, most wine making involves the use of yeasts.  Natural wines also ripen and change in taste and bouquet when correctly stored.

Ice Wine: the grapes are harvested only after the first frost under particularly plant friendly conditions.

Liqueurs:  for example strawberry, cherry, rosehip, red currant, blueberry, quince liqueur amongst others.  Alcohol is diluted with water to about 30-40%.  Ripe fruits are chopped and let sit in alcohol and water for a few days.  They are then juiced and filtered, fructose is added and then stored for approx. 2-6 months.  Brandy can also be used.

Punch made from various fruits, e.g. Cherry Punch: destoned cherries, fructose, cherry juice, orange juice (as well as other fruit juices to round off the flavour), mineral water, vanilla, some lemon, with or without alcohol – allow to sit for several hours before serving.



3.3   Cold Dishes

 

Soya Sausages with Pasta Salad

Croissants filled with Cream Cheese and pieces of tomato and pepper

Semolina Dumplings with Cranberry Sauce

Vegetable Platter (raw) with a selection of Dips

Egg and Tofu Platter, with a selection of garnishes

Cheese Pastries

Grain Patties in Breadcrumbs with a Green Bean Salad

Fromage Frais Pastries

Party Toast with Cheese and slices of Peach